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    How does Cricket's data service work at the tower?

    I don't completely understand how Cricket's data services work at the tower.

    It says on Cricket's website that you can get speeds up to "1.4 Mbps". Sprint says you can get speeds up to "3.1 Mbps". I just thought Sprint had more lines at their tower or something.

    So, let's say the max were to be 1.4 Mbps (which it can't be, and I'll explain why below). Does that mean that 14 people can be using data at the same time at 100 kbps? Is that how the capacity for data works? Also, if each line was only capable of 1.4 Mbps, how many lines do you think they have at a tower.

    Since the data outage yesterday, I've been seeing speeds faster than ever before. I got as high as 2.1 Mbps. So, this must mean Cricket can go faster than 1.4 Mbps. I'm guessing Cricket can hit 3.1 Mbps like Sprint. Why haven't I been getting speeds that good though? Has Cricket always been maxing out speeds at 1.4 Mbps so more people can use the network, or is it just that there are always people on the network and that's why it's slower? It's possible there wasn't anyone on the network when I did the speed test because it was when most other people were still experiencing data problems.

    I appreciate any replies.

    -Avenue

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    I'm not to sure but I know I'm only getting 128 kbps down and 22kbps up and it blows and that's when it says 1x but I never get any higher.

    Sent from my LS670 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by avenue View Post
    I don't completely understand how Cricket's data services work at the tower.

    It says on Cricket's website that you can get speeds up to "1.4 Mbps". Sprint says you can get speeds up to "3.1 Mbps". I just thought Sprint had more lines at their tower or something.

    So, let's say the max were to be 1.4 Mbps (which it can't be, and I'll explain why below). Does that mean that 14 people can be using data at the same time at 100 kbps? Is that how the capacity for data works? Also, if each line was only capable of 1.4 Mbps, how many lines do you think they have at a tower.

    Since the data outage yesterday, I've been seeing speeds faster than ever before. I got as high as 2.1 Mbps. So, this must mean Cricket can go faster than 1.4 Mbps. I'm guessing Cricket can hit 3.1 Mbps like Sprint. Why haven't I been getting speeds that good though? Has Cricket always been maxing out speeds at 1.4 Mbps so more people can use the network, or is it just that there are always people on the network and that's why it's slower? It's possible there wasn't anyone on the network when I did the speed test because it was when most other people were still experiencing data problems.

    I appreciate any replies.

    -Avenue
    Makes sense...that when just about everyones data was out and yours wasn't that you got better speeds .... Lucky haha

    Swyped this from my Droidx using tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by valentinoh View Post
    Makes sense...that when just about everyones data was out and yours wasn't that you got better speeds .... Lucky haha

    Swyped this from my Droidx using tapatalk
    Yeah that must have been it. I got excited thinking maybe they changed something and maybe I would continue to get better speeds.

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution-Data_Optimized


    - Information on the technology.

    The links between the phone and the tower is this HOWEVER the towers are probably linked to eachother using a different form. Either hardwire or wireless. The backend has much higher bandwidth.

    Please check the forum and post there before PMing me. I have over 674 unread PMs due to the fact that they are issues which should have been addressed here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisngrod View Post

    Evolution-Data Optimized - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    - Information on the technology.

    The links between the phone and the tower is this HOWEVER the towers are probably linked to eachother using a different form. Either hardwire or wireless. The backend has much higher bandwidth.
    Yeah, I heard there are T1 lines at Cricket's towers. I don't know if that's true or not. I've also heard there is fiber at some towers too. (Not sure if there is fiber at Cricket's towers, but there probably is one other towers.)


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    Quote Originally Posted by avenue View Post
    Yeah, I heard there are T1 lines at Cricket's towers. I don't know if that's true or not. I've also heard there is fiber at some towers too. (Not sure if there is fiber at Cricket's towers, but there probably is one other towers.)
    T1's are what is mostly used in most smaller carriers. Fiber to the site generally means that there is a major landline carrier with fiber there, which muxes down for others to use, which gets taken down network somewhere to a CFA to attach to the fiber ring for that particular provider. This will likely change when LTE starts becoming normal for even smaller carriers.

    On the cell providers end, there is generally an aggregate router, which takes all those t1's, which could be only one at a site, or many several depending on that towers area usage. which then route down to the local equipment at that facility to manage the data traffic(ralled a RAN, which includes an RNC), and eventually send it upstream down some serious fat pipes(which you would need for any metropolitan area)

    In lab scenario's where we had one site with three t1's(which is cheap since its just across the building) I have seen low 2 Mbps every time. But when you think about scale in the real world, those prices add up and it is nowhere near financially doable to spec out one t1 per possible customer. It is averages on usage, and when usage increases, planning additional capacity starts. Additional capacity is not just backhaul either, it can also be related to RF capacity needing another carrier, which also means adding carriers along neighbor towers, to prevent dropped data calls since inter carrier handoff's are more risky, and will result in higher drop call rate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by monty View Post
    T1's are what is mostly used in most smaller carriers. Fiber to the site generally means that there is a major landline carrier with fiber there, which muxes down for others to use, which gets taken down network somewhere to a CFA to attach to the fiber ring for that particular provider. This will likely change when LTE starts becoming normal for even smaller carriers.

    On the cell providers end, there is generally an aggregate router, which takes all those t1's, which could be only one at a site, or many several depending on that towers area usage. which then route down to the local equipment at that facility to manage the data traffic(ralled a RAN, which includes an RNC), and eventually send it upstream down some serious fat pipes(which you would need for any metropolitan area)

    In lab scenario's where we had one site with three t1's(which is cheap since its just across the building) I have seen low 2 Mbps every time. But when you think about scale in the real world, those prices add up and it is nowhere near financially doable to spec out one t1 per possible customer. It is averages on usage, and when usage increases, planning additional capacity starts. Additional capacity is not just backhaul either, it can also be related to RF capacity needing another carrier, which also means adding carriers along neighbor towers, to prevent dropped data calls since inter carrier handoff's are more risky, and will result in higher drop call rate.
    What is a T1 line capable of? Let's say there was one T1 line at a tower, what is the maximum speed a user could get?

    If the maximum is 1 Mbps, for example, does that mean ten people can be using it at 100 kbps?

    Thanks for your post. I'll be reading it a few more times to try to absorb the information.

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    Quote Originally Posted by monty View Post
    T1's are what is mostly used in most smaller carriers. Fiber to the site generally means that there is a major landline carrier with fiber there, which muxes down for others to use, which gets taken down network somewhere to a CFA to attach to the fiber ring for that particular provider. This will likely change when LTE starts becoming normal for even smaller carriers.

    On the cell providers end, there is generally an aggregate router, which takes all those t1's, which could be only one at a site, or many several depending on that towers area usage. which then route down to the local equipment at that facility to manage the data traffic(ralled a RAN, which includes an RNC), and eventually send it upstream down some serious fat pipes(which you would need for any metropolitan area)

    In lab scenario's where we had one site with three t1's(which is cheap since its just across the building) I have seen low 2 Mbps every time. But when you think about scale in the real world, those prices add up and it is nowhere near financially doable to spec out one t1 per possible customer. It is averages on usage, and when usage increases, planning additional capacity starts. Additional capacity is not just backhaul either, it can also be related to RF capacity needing another carrier, which also means adding carriers along neighbor towers, to prevent dropped data calls since inter carrier handoff's are more risky, and will result in higher drop call rate.
    So, when I got 2.1 Mbps I was probably one of few people connected to the tower, or to that T1 line? Since in your tests you got low 2 Mbps that would mean that it's almost impossible to reach the 3.1 Mbps that EVDO Rev A is capable of, correct?

    Thanks again.

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    An non channelized t1 is capable of 1.544Mbps. However heavy calculations are used to plan since not everyone saturates their connection 24x7, otherwise we would all be paying higher prices for broadband. You were likely one of few connected to that tower at the time, and since others can be connected but not pushing data, you were likely the only one using active resources at the time.

    As for the lab, I am sure it could go higher, but the toy cell was a few hundred feet away, which doesnt sound like much but they have "dummy" loads on them instead of real antenna's since they are not mounting them far from people. So its not the best RF scenario for a mobile to be in, in fact it probably represents a better real world scenario, since not everyone has line of sight to an antenna.

    Also in the area's I have worked, you are not bound to a T1, we use mlppp which is a way of binding multiple t1's to one virtual interface. In this way you are just adding bandwidth, not creating a barrier on being on one or the other, if that makes sense. A tower with two t1's (T1's being 1.544Mbps each) would equal 3.088 total available bandwidth. You will probably never see that in real life due to RF limitations, but that also has to deal with the fact each tower normally has 3 antenna's all with their own unique potential customers. In the end you get an even share of whats available, and if the engineer's did their job well, it will grant you a level of service equal to what has been sold to you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by monty View Post
    An non channelized t1 is capable of 1.544Mbps. However heavy calculations are used to plan since not everyone saturates their connection 24x7, otherwise we would all be paying higher prices for broadband. You were likely one of few connected to that tower at the time, and since others can be connected but not pushing data, you were likely the only one using active resources at the time.

    As for the lab, I am sure it could go higher, but the toy cell was a few hundred feet away, which doesnt sound like much but they have "dummy" loads on them instead of real antenna's since they are not mounting them far from people. So its not the best RF scenario for a mobile to be in, in fact it probably represents a better real world scenario, since not everyone has line of sight to an antenna.

    Also in the area's I have worked, you are not bound to a T1, we use mlppp which is a way of binding multiple t1's to one virtual interface. In this way you are just adding bandwidth, not creating a barrier on being on one or the other, if that makes sense. A tower with two t1's (T1's being 1.544Mbps each) would equal 3.088 total available bandwidth. You will probably never see that in real life due to RF limitations, but that also has to deal with the fact each tower normally has 3 antenna's all with their own unique potential customers. In the end you get an even share of whats available, and if the engineer's did their job well, it will grant you a level of service equal to what has been sold to you.
    So, I can be connected to two T1 lines at the same time? That is why I was getting more than 1.544 Mbps?

    How many T1 lines do you think are at towers in rural areas? Somebody told me that it wouldn't make sense to add just one T1 line. They said if you put up one line, you can afford to run multiple lines. They said it costs the most to start it, but adding additional lines is cheap. Is that true?

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    Like I said, mlppp just binds two network interfaces into one. So your packets go out both, its like when I shotgunned two 56K modems back in high school. It add's to the bandwidth.

    Rural can be an opinion, are you talking rural but somewhat suburban, or rural where everyone owns a few acres, and some farms as well? If there are enough customers to warrant more than one T1, any company will pay for it, otherwise service would suck. But mostly in the smaller companies I have worked for, rural means that there is a major driving route between key customer area's. And they normally just have one t1, since most customers are driving through the area, and are not on that one tower longer than a few minutes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by monty View Post
    Like I said, mlppp just binds two network interfaces into one. So your packets go out both, its like when I shotgunned two 56K modems back in high school. It add's to the bandwidth.

    Rural can be an opinion, are you talking rural but somewhat suburban, or rural where everyone owns a few acres, and some farms as well? If there are enough customers to warrant more than one T1, any company will pay for it, otherwise service would suck. But mostly in the smaller companies I have worked for, rural means that there is a major driving route between key customer area's. And they normally just have one t1, since most customers are driving through the area, and are not on that one tower longer than a few minutes.
    I'm talking about rural with farms and houses spread apart. According to what you said, there is probably just one T1 line there.

    This is very interesting..

    When you put those two 56K modems together, were you bragging about it? That must have been the coolest thing..

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    Quote Originally Posted by avenue View Post
    I'm talking about rural with farms and houses spread apart. According to what you said, there is probably just one T1 line there.

    This is very interesting..

    When you put those two 56K modems together, were you bragging about it? That must have been the coolest thing..
    That was awhile ago, before being a computer geek had any respect, no there was nobody to brag to. I just did it so I could download stuff faster. The parents were not too happy that I tied up both phone lines in the house

    As for the speeds, if you got higher than 1.54Mbps, I assure you that you had more bandwidth than a single t1. There could be many factors, high traffic roads nearby called for the need, one single community within range of the tower, or even if there was some sort of event nearby in the recent past where a large group of people came around (that they planned for) that they had to upgrade for it (T1 ordering and cancel lead times can be very long).

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    Quote Originally Posted by monty View Post
    That was awhile ago, before being a computer geek had any respect, no there was nobody to brag to. I just did it so I could download stuff faster. The parents were not too happy that I tied up both phone lines in the house

    As for the speeds, if you got higher than 1.54Mbps, I assure you that you had more bandwidth than a single t1. There could be many factors, high traffic roads nearby called for the need, one single community within range of the tower, or even if there was some sort of event nearby in the recent past where a large group of people came around (that they planned for) that they had to upgrade for it (T1 ordering and cancel lead times can be very long).
    So, I can be connected to more than one T1 line at a tower (we came to this conclusion earlier) but can I be connected to more than one T1 line at DIFFERENT towers?

    I'm sorry if you already answered that question. I read your post more than once and didn't see that.

    Thanks!

 

 
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